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Author Topic: 67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread  (Read 1309 times)

Offline Joanne_

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67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread
« on: February 24, 2011, 09:56:24 AM »
This is a two day recipe, and it's the first time I tried it after basically making it up a few days ago.  Normally I have to tweak a recipe a lot before it actually comes out to be a really good bread.  Not so with this one, first two loaves and not only are they awesome, my husband says they are the best I have ever made.  They look like overblown balloons even though I had actually weighed out two pounds of dough for each pan and used the extra for a few rolls.  I wouldn't change a thing about this recipe, except that I would put less dough in each pan. 







As you can see they have a Frankenstein look to them, but it's a pretty awesome bread for being 67% whole wheat.

I posted more details and the baker's percentages on my blog at:

http://journeywithbaking.blogspot.com/2011/02/67-whole-wheat-flax-bread.html

--
Joanne
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I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.     Martha Washington (17

Offline Paul

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Re: 67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2011, 02:00:55 PM »
Frankensteinish or no, they look tasty! :thumbup:
Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Joanne_

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Re: 67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2011, 02:37:30 PM »
I think the presoaking of the fresh milled flour really helped the texture a lot, but I have to try it with a smaller soaker first to really decide if that's true.   :hmm:
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Joanne
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I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.     Martha Washington (17

Offline Zeb

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Re: 67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2011, 04:16:39 AM »
Keep going backwards and forwards, just read your post Joanne :)  and forgot to ask if you used hot water or cold water in your soaker.  Hot water soakers are something I have used from time to time, the flour gets gelatinised and releases some of the sugars in the flour or something like that, you get a sweeter finished bread without adding extra sugar, though I don't know how it would work with your freshly milled flour.
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Joanne_

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Re: 67% Whole Wheat Flax Bread
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2011, 10:11:45 AM »
Oh, another variable that definitely needs to be considered!  I just used room temperature water to the ground flax and fresh ground white whole wheat flour.  The rest of the ingredients I added the next day, about 20 hours later.  Hot water would definitely make a difference I think, so I will have to make this recipes at least 3 times to decide what I like best.   

It's odd though, the next day when I tasted the bread without anything on it, there was a bitter taste that came through.  I am using some of the ingredients in other recipes, simply to see if one might be causing this.  Yesterday I made sourdough with fresh ground flour, and I am glad to say it's not the wheat berries.  The bread had a sweet taste to it.  I suspect it might be the malt, but have no proof of that so far! 

I always seem to have some experiment going....
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Joanne
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I am still determined to be cheerful and happy, in whatever situation I may be; for I have also learned from experience that the greater part of our happiness or misery depends upon our dispositions, and not upon our circumstances.     Martha Washington (17