Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Sourdough question  (Read 1823 times)

Offline Abby

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 362
    • Stir it! Scrape it! Mix it! Bake it!
Sourdough question
« on: November 24, 2010, 04:38:14 PM »
This seems like a stupid question, but I can't find the answer anywhere....

I've been experimenting with a bunch of Hamelman's whole wheat recipes, looking for a good sandwich loaf that the kids will actually eat. I (can't believe I've come this far!!) find that I much prefer the breads baked from my sourdough starter than the ones made just with instant yeast. Hamelman always instructs us to shape his whole wheat levains round or oblong and bake with steam...Can I bake the same recipes in a loaf pan??  :hmm: I feel like the traditional sandwich shape may make it more appealing to the kids.

Offline Jacqueline

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 77
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2010, 05:14:16 PM »
Hi Abby! Of course you can put the sourdough in a loaf tin; I used to do it all the time when I was baking in a tiny oven (the flour from cloths/baskets would catch and burn and set off the fire alarm, so tins were more practical). You do end up with something a bit different, I found- different crust ('cos most of it's covered by tin), and not such a dramatic open texture, if it's a plain white sourdough. However, for breads with more wholemeal/grains/rye that isn't so much of an issue.

If it's a big tin with a lot of dough in it, I also used to find that it took quite some time to be properly 'done' around the lower sides and bottom. So sometimes I'd take the loaf out and finish it off for five or ten minutes just sitting on the oven rack. But maybe that's just my oven.

Interestingly, colour plate #11 (in my edition of 'Bread') shows tin loaves made with baguette dough (with pâte fermentée, p. 103). Hamelman does mention that this can be done in his discussion of this recipe, on page 104. I know it's not a sourdough, but surely this dough shares many of the characteristics of breads in the leavain chapter.

Anyway, dough's a flexible thing, if it can be a big round miche or little dinner rolls, why not a tin-loaf shape??

Cheers, Jacqueline

Offline Abby

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 362
    • Stir it! Scrape it! Mix it! Bake it!
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2010, 07:24:01 PM »
Thanks so much for the help, Jacqueline!!

I kind of assumed I could make the switch to loaf pans, but didn't want to mess it up. It turned out okay . . . I tried to bake it during our holiday yesterday so it had some rests in the fridge at various points . . . and I think I used too big of a pan for the amount of dough as it never rose to fill it so it's a short little loaf . . . but the flavor was good! I will definitely try the method with other loaves.


Offline Jacqueline

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 77
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2010, 08:41:51 PM »
Hi again Abby,

Yes, I also found that tins take more dough than you think they will- the tins I have are 10" long x 4.5" wide x 3.5" high, and I find I generally need 900g-1kg of dough for a nice high loaf- so two pounds, I guess.

This is a light rye sourdough that I baked in a tin a while ago...


Offline Zeb

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • Zeb Bakes
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2010, 09:13:59 AM »
I bake sourdoughs sometimes in tins and the crumb tends to be closer as you would expect, but good for sandwiches  ;)  I made one the other day, all my tins are non stick, so they have that extra bit of coating on them.

The only caveat is that I once read a thread on another forum where someone had put their sourdough starter in the fridge, covered it with foil and come back the next day to find there were small holes in the foil, and bits of aluminium floating around on top of his sourdough.  I tried to replicate this at home, but didn't manage to get a tin eating sourdough going myself. I would be interested to know if anyone else had had a similar experience out there....
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Abby

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 362
    • Stir it! Scrape it! Mix it! Bake it!
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2010, 01:50:15 PM »
I did change the baking temperature . . . JH calls for 460F for the whole wheat levain that I was making. Peter Reinhart in the BBA has you bake panned loaves at 350F. I couldn't find any special instructions in JH, so I went with PR and 350F. I set the timer for 30 minutes and then checked every few minutes.

Do you change the temp if you bake in a tin?

Offline Zeb

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • Zeb Bakes
Re: Sourdough question
« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2010, 04:35:35 PM »
I do tins at 220-230 C for  the first 20 minutes and then drop back to 200 C. I think in F that is 450 -  425 to start and 400 for the last part. I've reprinted a conversion table here.  I only use temperatures hotter than that for the very fast bakes like pizza and so on. Every oven is different, so you might have to experiment a bit.

The width of your tin will have an affect on the time it needs, a narrow tin will bake quicker than a flat wide one.  Hope this helps Abby!

Fahrenheit    Celsius    Gas mark    
225 F    105 C    1/4    Very cool
250 F    120 C    1/2    
275 F    130 C    1    Cool
300 F    150 C    2    
325 F    165 C    3    Very moderate
350 F    180 C    4    Moderate
375 F    190 C    5    
400 F    200 C    6    Moderately hot
425 F    220 C    7    Hot
450 F    230 C    8    
475 F    245 C    9    Very hot
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes