Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview  (Read 2072 times)

Offline Paul

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
  • Baking tons... but at work.
    • Yumarama Bread Blog
#30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« on: October 24, 2010, 08:55:24 AM »
Another Amalgamation bread, this time three Ciabatta variations. These can be located in the Yeasted Pre-Ferment section and are as follows:

Ciabatta with Stiff Biga, pg 105 - and there is a correction for this one.
Ciabatta with Poolish, pg 107
Ciabatta with Olive Oil & Wheat Germ, pg 109

As always, being Mellow, it's up to you if you want to do one, two or all three varieties of this bread.

Be prepared to work with a much wetter dough than usual here, Ciabattas are famous for being high hydration bread which in turn results in a very open crumb. Great for sopping up a little EVOO and Balsamic Vinegar with a sprinkle of sea salt as a tasty Appetizer.

You can see some interesting dip and topping combinations here:


http://www.dipbread.com/delicious-bread-dipping-recipes


The Errata:
For the HOME column on page 105, the water in the final dough should be:
1 lb 3.6 oz (2 1/2 cups) [556 grams]

For those joining us a little later in the challenge or who need to grab a fresh copy, the Official Errata Sheet for the book BREAD can be downloaded here:
http://Mellowbakers.com/index.php?topic=242.0
Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Zeb

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • Zeb Bakes
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2010, 06:41:14 PM »
You can find a recipe for the ciabatta with olive oil and wheat germ reprinted on the Californiaolive ranch site by permission of Jeffrey Hamelman.

Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 596
    • Living in the Kitchen with Puppies
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2010, 08:49:03 PM »
Groovy! Also, I want those bowls. They are too cool!

Offline ostwestwind

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
    • Küchenlatein
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2010, 11:57:51 PM »
I think I'll bake ciabattas in spring or in summer, we are not in the mood baking ciabatta in the festive season
Ulrike aka ostwestwind at

Küchenlatein

Offline Zeb

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • Zeb Bakes
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2010, 02:45:49 AM »
Sounds good Ulrike!  Look forward to seeing your mellow ciabatta in the Spring sometime. Do let us know what you (and anyone else  :yumm:)  bake though... maybe in the festive section?   :D
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Jacqueline

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 77
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2010, 04:26:27 PM »
Excellent! This is what I've been waiting for- summer has arrived, everyone's wearing sandals, and those warm summer evenings- just the time of year for ciabatta. Plus I've always wanted to master the ciabatta...will see how I get on this weekend.

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 596
    • Living in the Kitchen with Puppies
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2010, 02:17:49 PM »
I have done the two poolish ones and am just doing the biga one. Have you guys noticed that his bigas are really underhydrated? I always have to add a bit more water to even knead mine together. Maybe big batch to small batch doesn't translate well for the biga, although I assume they test the home versions.

Offline Zeb

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 755
    • Zeb Bakes
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2010, 04:24:34 PM »
I've just had a look in Artisan Baking (Maggie Glezer) the ciabatta recipe in there for Craig Ponsford's ciabatta has a biga made with mixed flours with a hydration of 61% and the final dough formula in percentages is:

ap flour 100%
yeast 1%
salt 4%
water 105%
Biga 158%

How does that compare to JH's? MG says that 'a traditional biga is a very stiff pre-ferment using about 50-60 percent water to flour weight. She says further that ...' this pre-ferment was developed to works with weak italian flours and is used to strengthen a dough via the acetic acid which reinforces the gluten.  P 103 Artisan Baking by Maggie Glezer.  I don't know if this helps, I don't know much about bigas so can only go by what I read.

So a weak flour and a lot of water is what we need for a big airy ciabatta.... how does that sound? Does anyone have other formulae for ciabatta we can compare ?
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline drfugawe

  • On Board
  • *
  • Posts: 8
    • The Lost World of Drfugawe
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2010, 08:54:31 AM »
Hi Jo,
Interesting note about the weak Italian flour used in ciabatta - I don't think JH is taking that approach as he is calling for bread flour, which is not a weak flour.  I looked at his (JH) flour of choice for baguettes, which I know in France use a weaker flour as well, and he also calls for bread flour - and I've seen reference to U.S. bakers using an All Purpose (our low protein flour here) for baguettes.  I looked in Village Baker (Joe Ortiz) and The Italian Baker (Carol Field), both of whom did extensive research in Italy, and they both suggest using AP flour for ciabatta.

I think I'll give JH's Poolish Ciabatta a go here, 'cause I've done the stiff biga kind, and didn't enjoy working with that - but I've discovered that when you use a "tub" (the rectangle plastic containers used in restaurants for food storage) with a lid, and freely oil it, that it makes working with wet doughs almost a joy - l love it.
doc

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 596
    • Living in the Kitchen with Puppies
Re: #30 - 32: The Ciabattas Overview
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2010, 05:20:44 PM »
You guys have a point, maybe I'll use AP next time. Canadian flour is known for being fairly strong.
Cheers!