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Author Topic: Bread Photography  (Read 1590 times)

Offline Sloan

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Bread Photography
« on: June 14, 2010, 05:14:19 PM »
I've been very impressed by the bread photography I've seen at this website.  Anyone willing to pass along some pointers or sources to a rank amateur?

Offline yemu

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Re: Bread Photography
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2010, 05:57:47 AM »

Offline Steve

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Re: Bread Photography
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2010, 07:54:13 AM »
Thanks, Yemu!    :clap:

Offline Paul

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Re: Bread Photography
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2010, 04:54:04 PM »
Tips:

1) Set up your White Balance properly. The AWB is not always the best.
2) Take shots (at least the Glams) from different angles. Right above or lower down, not always from normal eye level down.
3) Learn to use your camera's F stops to compress the depth of field
4) Lighting is paramount. Buy cheapo clamp lamps and put Daylight fluorescents in them. Then adjust your White Balance accordingly.
5) I strongly second http://www.foodbloggersunite.com but there are other sites online that will give useful tips on blogger-level (vs magazine etc.) food photography.
Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline yemu

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Re: Bread Photography
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2010, 04:13:15 AM »
after reading paul's post I've started googling and found this:

http://www.learnfoodphotography.com/download-food-photography-ebook/

just browsed through it and it seems it can be useful

also check this:

http://www.foodportfolio.com/blog/#blog

best regards
y

Offline Zeb

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Re: Bread Photography
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2010, 05:17:14 PM »
I have a lumix with a setting that says 'Food'  that's what I use for the indoor bread shots. But I tend to drag the bread into the garden wherever possible as you may have noticed. Of course then you have to protect the bread from environmental hazards such as seagull guano and stop the dogs, but the benefits of natural light are worth it usually.  I am thinking about daylight bulbs and clamps but I am so lazy I just wander around looking for a good spot. The light varies in my kitchen from season to season, I like the winter light which is low and soft and comes in at a nice angle, hits the glass splash back and creates diffuse light.
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes