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Author Topic: Bread disaster pictures anyone?  (Read 9246 times)

Offline Steve

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #30 on: May 05, 2010, 12:42:13 PM »
Thanks, Ulrike, I think that is what I had seen referenced before.  The 'sort of' pumpernickel I made was a really wet dough and was only baked for a little over four hours before I panicked and took it out.   

I obviously did not know what I was doing, but I did get some unusual flavors from the long and low baking.

Thanks for posting that link.  Here is the same link through Google translate:
http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bmelv.de%2Fcae%2Fservlet%2Fcontentblob%2F379754%2FpublicationFile%2F22005%2FLeitsaetzeBrot.pdf&sl=auto&tl=en


I really like your web site - very creative!

Offline lello

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #31 on: June 15, 2010, 05:46:31 AM »
This is an amazing idea!!! Unfortunately I don't have pictures but my worst disaster was the following (just two months ago): I had a lunch on Sunday, and I prepared a dough on Saturday evening that should have been left to ferment overnight, not just a biga, something like 2 pounds of dough, I don't remember where I got the recipe. I left the dough in the oven...ops...I don't know how but accidentally I turned on the grill at minimum temperature.
On Sunday morning (early) I wake up to bake the bread and have it ready for lunch, but I find just a black hard ball.
Last minute solution, called my friend and asked him to bring some baguette from a bakery :(.

Sorry no pictures, but sharing disasters makes me feel much better :)



Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #32 on: June 16, 2010, 08:20:08 AM »
My latest WW bread grew so much, the top was too heavy it pinched both sides of the loaf while I was slicing it. The 2 slices before I cut the whole top off look like mushrooms. :)

I tried to fluff the rest of the slices to make them look square.The only ingredients I added to a regular WW/BF recipe were a tablespoon each of vital wheat gluten and malt flour. The bread has the Wonder bread softness but is not as fine-textured.



« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 10:25:38 AM by Oggi »

Offline Zeb

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #33 on: June 16, 2010, 10:05:53 AM »
That's a great tale Lello! And I love your porcini mushroom lookalike bread Oggi -  maybe you should try your hand at making cottage loaves with that dough? Have you ever made those? They often look like this, always falling over and generally misbehaving.

here's the first time I made them at a lovely baking get together in Wales - as you can see they are very variable and the oven they were baked in was a huge wood fired oven and scorched the tops a bit



These are some slightly calmer ones, but they get very excitable !

Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #34 on: June 16, 2010, 10:29:14 AM »
These are some slightly calmer ones, but they get very excitable !



I love your description of the loaves. lol

I haven't heard of them, can you share the recipe? I would love to make them. They look lovely and delicious. :)

Offline Zeb

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #35 on: June 16, 2010, 12:17:41 PM »
Oggi, these are a very old traditional english loaf shape, and what I have read about them suggests the shape was originally Roman! Called a cottage loaf because it looks a little like an old fashioned english thatched cottage - possibly?

You can make a cottage loaf out of any firmish dough. Tradtionally something like an overnight white yeasted bread, but I have seen all sorts of doughs being used to make them. Did you ever see the Aardman film 'A Matter of Loaf and Death'  They are in there too! There is a classic english book on Bread making from the '70s by Elizabeth David which describes how to make them: here is an excerpt from that book with my notes. You don't have to bake it that way of course.  I have also made them as little rolls a couple of times.

Quote
675g strong unbleached flour
225 g of an 80 percent wholemeal flour (a light wholemeal)
just over 15 g of yeast
500 g water

so a hydration of  55 %  - a very firm dough compared to what I usually make!

ED says that she remembers the topknot always leant to one side, something like a brioche a tete.

Here is a summary of her notes:

After the first rising, the dough should be divided into two pieces, the one for the top weighing approx one third or a little more of the total.

For the second rising or proving, the two pieces should be kept separate. Roll each one into a ball, turning the folds of the bottom piece under, those of the topknot upwards. (Not sure what the reason is for this )  Cover both pieces so that no skin forms.

Before the second proving is complete, i.e. after about 45 minutes instead of the more usual hour ED describes the assembly process as follows:

she flattens the top of the bottom loaf, makes a small cross shaped cut about 1 and a half inches across. Then she flattens slightly the base of the top knot and perches it on the bottom loaf. The flattening of the two peices of dough is key. Without a flat surface on which to rest the top knot, the bottom piece of the loaf collapses. 

With your thumb and first two fingers joined to make a cone shape, press a hole through the centre of the topknot down into the main body of the loaf. This joins the two loaves and gives the charateristic appearance to the loaf.( Don't be violent she says as this can distort the dough shape)

Then cover with a deep bowl and leave to recover, but not for too long, or it will spread and lose its shape,  Ten minutes recovery time that looks like.

Then she bakes them from cold !!

Do not, in any case, preheat the oven. Turn it to as hot as it goes 450 F 230 C or gas 8 or 9 immediately before putting in the loaf, on the lower shelf. As the oven heats up, so the loaf expands.  For this to work the dough must be slightly underproved.   

I tried this and it does work.  You get a loaf with a very tight dense crumb and this is not entirely to my taste,  really old fashioned sort of bread.

After 30 minutes when the loaf has risen and taken shape, it is a good idea to cover it with a bowl in order to prevent the crust becoming too hard and tough, but towards the end of baking time uncover the loaf again to let out the steam and for any final browning of crust....

Elsewhere she writes about a baker's steel bonnet 10 inches by 10 inches, sort of like a cloche or baking cover which was especially successful with the tricky cottage loaf. So if you have an outsize stockpot or bowl that is oven proof maybe put one over the bread?? 
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #36 on: June 16, 2010, 01:04:48 PM »
Joanna, thank you. I will make it ASAP. I'll post the result here whether it's successful or not.

The bread reminds me of my favorite childhood bread bun which I recently blogged about. The difference is the oven is preheated but the buns are baked without a second proofing. They go in the oven as soon as the buns are shaped. The result is buns with hard shells but soft innards.

About the movie, is it Wallace and Gromit or another movie? I haven't seen it yet; I put it at the top of our netflix list. Can't wait to watch it. W & G is one of my faves. :)

Offline Steve

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #37 on: June 16, 2010, 01:59:53 PM »
I have never seen one of these loaves before, so I question that they belong on the page for 'disasters'!

They look good to me.  I found an internet site to see what they were supposed to look like, and Joanna, I still don't see what is wrong with yours.

I did see one interesting picture, though.  Either use your fingers, or...



They claimed (by legend) that these were first constructed to efficiently utilize oven space.

Offline Zeb

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #38 on: June 16, 2010, 04:36:19 PM »
Yes  Wallace and Gromit bake!  It's brilliant! 

Steve they're not officially disasters, more a bread with a high potential for disaster, the tops blow off, they slide sideways and so on. Just found an example of a tray of sliding cottage buns I made in the summer. What do you reckon? You used to be able to get them in the local bakery when I was growing up, haven't seen one for years now....   and I thought maybe Oggi's porcini dough would make a good cottage loaf as it had such great spring! As in one baker's disaster is another's cottage loaf...  :hmm:

Speaking from experience, poking through with a chopstick if it is a big cottage loaf won't do the trick, you need to apply sideways pressure once you have punched through the two loaves. So you use two  or four fingers, back to back and then separate them and sort of weld as you go.  My friend Celia hosted a cottage loaf bake off on her blog if you're curious to see more. But you're right -  way off topic. Should have a thread of its own really.  :doh:
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 05:21:39 PM by Zeb »
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Steve

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2010, 08:26:05 AM »
Oh, I think it is on topic, I was just amazed that your failures are nicer than my successes!   :doh:

Interesting stuff!  Thank you.

Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #40 on: June 20, 2010, 03:56:27 PM »
Joanna, here are the loaves I made today. My, but they really get excitable.  lol

I halved your recipe and made 4 loaves of 160 grams each. Only one came out a bit straight, and the three were all leaning. I flattened them but the bottom doughs seem to spring unevenly. But I actually like the way they look and love the dense but soft crumb. I'll probably make these again with sourdough. Thanks for introducing me to these unusual bread. Oh, and I love the movie. I already played it twice. :)





Offline Zeb

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2010, 04:42:55 PM »
Oggi ! They are perfect!  Clever you  pompom 
That's exactly how they should look. Full of character, like little people!   It's a funny dough isn't it?  you describe it very well. Look forward to seeing your sourdough version.  I have made them in all different sizes. The biggest ones were about 900 grams (600 g bottom, 300 gram top) and the littlest the rolls which were about 100 grams in weight in total.  I think those middle ones are about 600 grams. People sometimes make them with the top ball quite small but then they look like brioche. 

Anyway I am really chuffed that you made them.  :clap:  And glad you liked the movie too!
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #42 on: June 28, 2010, 05:36:49 PM »
Full of character, like little people!   

Joanna,
Funny, that's what came to mind when I took them out of the oven. Oh and I watched again the full-length movie The Curse of the Were Rabbit, and 3 other shorts.


Here's today's disaster....

I baked [a second batch] of pita and for some reason the last one out of 12 didn't puff up completely the same time as the others so I left it in the oven but forgot about it. When the house started smelling of burnt bread I realized it was still there. I couldn't take it out because if I open the oven door the heat and smoke will trigger our extra sensitive smoke alarm. The burnt pita looks almost like a giant charcoal briquet. lol






Offline Paul

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #43 on: June 28, 2010, 06:21:35 PM »
 :o  rofl.. That's ART!
Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Oggi

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Re: Bread disaster pictures anyone?
« Reply #44 on: June 29, 2010, 09:30:30 AM »
Paul, it would have been better if it resembles a famous person, say, Mother Teresa or Vladimir Putin. Then I could sell it on eBay. :)