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Author Topic: The secrets of scoring bread  (Read 2395 times)

Offline Naomi

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The secrets of scoring bread
« on: August 14, 2011, 01:09:24 PM »
Hello,

I'm having difficulties scoring my breads. They either glue back together or fall completely...
Can someone share the secret of scoring bread?

Thanks,
Naomi

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2011, 02:46:24 PM »
Well, I am not an expert and have certainly had my problems - but I do find that scoring is easier if you have a proper bread lame, rather than a knife. Do you have one?

Offline Naomi

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2011, 12:49:12 PM »
No, don't have one..

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2011, 03:47:23 PM »
Maybe a new razor blade, the ones that you pop into a blade holder. We get them from Home Depot. Anything super sharp and really thin should do.

Offline Zeb

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2011, 05:28:31 PM »
Hi Naomi

Things to try: a razor blade, you can if you are feeling brave make a home made lame using a coffee stirrer like this
I wrote a little post about lames the other day, I don't have any 100% answers, my slashing doesn't always work either, but I get more successes and fewer failures the more I practise. Some doughs are terrible though and just close up, those are usually the ones which have a high hydration and are on the point of being overproved.

Some suggestions of things to try :

Cold slightly underproved tightly shaped dough is easier to slash than warm fully proved dough. Try leaving your dough in the fridge, slashing it when it is cold and baking it from cold.

 You could also try for a dough with 60% or less hydration, that should be easier as well.

Holding the blade you use at an angle, often described as slitting an envelope, is the standard advice, again if you don't do this it might be worth experimenting.  Hope this helps a bit :)
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Naomi

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2011, 02:34:08 AM »
Thanks everyone! I'm going to look for a razor blade.
Also, what is this flour that is on top of baked, prooved breads?
Other than making it look very pretty, does it have another goal?
Thanks again everyone!

Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2011, 06:53:51 AM »
Hi - I can only speak for my own breads - but generally if you see one of my breads that seems to have a fair amount of flour or grain on top - I have proofed it upside-down in a well-floured (or mix of flour and coarse grain) brotform or lined basket.

Offline Zeb

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Re: The secrets of scoring bread
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2011, 01:54:45 PM »
As Natashya says it is often the flour out of the bottom of the proving basket, sometimes I sprinkle flour on the top of my tinned loaves too, that way you get a contrast in the slash opening colour and the rest of the loaf, it's very traditional in England to have floured tops to white loaves in particular. It might protect the dough slightly as well, but I'm guessing there...
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes