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Author Topic: What next?  (Read 5811 times)

Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2011, 09:31:04 AM »
Alrighty, so far we have:

and 

as possible books.

Are there any other books people might want to put up for recommendations? I haven't got any of the Lepard books, so I can't make any suggestions there but I know a few of you do. Let's see if we can narrow it down to one choice: here's an Amazon list of Lepard books. Plus it seems Mr Lepard is approchable on a personal level so could be contacted easily for assistance when needed.

Any other ideas? If we can get another contender or two we'll toss it up as a poll in a separate thread and see where it goes.

Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Zeb

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Re: What next?
« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2011, 01:30:03 AM »
I really like Maggie Gleazer's book Artisan Baking across America, which I've bought but not made any breads from yet, but I would love to make some and that was what I was going to do next by myself maybe,  and I have the Flat Bread book so I would vote for either of those.

I have made nearly all the breads from Dan's book which is my favourite bread book for many reasons. He has a new baking book coming out this month called Short and Sweet.

Those are my suggestions anyway....
 
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2011, 01:10:35 AM »
OK, so here are two more books to consider:


Lepard's Handmade Loaf and...


Either versions of Glezer's Artisan Baking
 
Both of the books above are "Artisan Baking Across America" by Maggie Glezer. The darker one is the paperback version; the lighter on the right (which I think looks much better) is the more expensive but older and harder to find hardcover. I don't have this one (I do have her "Blessing of Bread" though) and I've read great reviews about it. Even Dan Lepard says it's a great book! (Read the worst review on Amazon.com and the comments that review got.)

Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Zeb

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Re: What next?
« Reply #18 on: September 19, 2011, 02:16:02 AM »
Sorry Paul!

Dan Lepard's classic bread book is The Handmade Loaf, which is the one book I would take to the desert island...

His new book is Short and Sweet which is out soon, blurb here, http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/products/dan+lepard/short+and+sweet/8009862/ but I haven't seen yet. He's also working on a British Baking book but that's a way away still.

I have the paperback version of Artisan Baking across America, which is out and as you say well reviewed and I haven't baked much from it yet but I really like the way it reads,  one of the  things I really like is the way the recipes are laid out, with all the measurements and weights easy to read,  recipe synopsis and more.  I have Blessing of Bread too, I have far too many bread books.  Want to ask how school is, but that's waay off topic.... best Joanna
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2011, 11:22:35 AM »
No worries, Jo, I'll update the above post.

As to school... I'm blogging weekly (so far) about what we do in class so people who are interested in Baking School can see what happens at CIVIU and maybe be inspired to find something similar locally.  Bottom line: it's great, fun and fascinating.

This week we'll be getting into chocolate tempering and basic cake decorating. This is our last week of "orientation" where we dip a bit into all segments; next week we start in earnest and get more detailed.

So, should we toss in Lepard's "Short and Sweet" as another possible choice? Although it isn't due out until Oct 20 and we don't know (yet) what it will contain as far as range and number of recipes, it will be there when we've done Hamelman. It would be cool to be the first group to have a crack at it as well. Plus, it can go on people's Christmas wish list. I also personally like that it's not all bread.


Paul
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Offline breadexperience

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Re: What next?
« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2011, 02:56:07 PM »
Flatbreads and Flavors sounds interesting.  But I'm with Paul, I would prefer not to commit to another two years of baking through a book. 

Offline Lien

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Re: What next?
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2011, 06:20:12 AM »
I have just been reading this topic, though I love Alford/Duguid, I'd rather be doing baking instead of cooking (too). Baking is easier to fit in my schedule. And some cooking would be fine, but not a whole book to be honest.

Glezer's book is fantastic, having said that, I baked a large amount out of it already, so that would be either easy or lazy for me I guess.

I kinda like the idea of the pastry book (Hitz) especially because it it short. I wouldn't feel like baking pastries for three years, it is a nice change from bread, but still baking. (Don't have the book though)

The new book from Lepard would be good too (I was thinking about buying that). I like it too that it's a combination bread and pastry. Just as long as it's not a book with recipes already published before in his other books  (he has done that before, which is a waste of good money).



I like Bourke Street Bakery as well. Also a combination of breads, pastries (sweet and savory!) sourdoughs, yeasted (sometimes with a starter too), all pastry doughs + recipes (croissants, danish) savory  pastries and pies (like chickpea rolls, humble beef pie, sweet potato, chicken and lime pickle pie...) just people who are vegetarians will be having a problem here. Also cakes and biscuits (sponge cake, apple galette, macadamia short bread, muffins, etc.) and a few desserts like trifle, meringues.

A quick count (about 81 recipes):
23 breads (sourdough, yeasted)
7 sweet pastries
17 savory rolls and pies
16 tarts (sweet)
15 cakes and cookies
3 desserts
« Last Edit: October 31, 2011, 04:26:31 PM by Paul »

Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #22 on: October 31, 2011, 04:40:52 PM »
OK, in the next couple of weeks, I'll close up this thread and start a fresh one with everyone's suggestions and put it up for a vote with all books suggested so far.

So as of right now, Oct 31, there's still a few weeks or so to pop in suggestions for not just books but HOW we should move on. We don't HAVE to do a book, we could rotate through the members and suggest something based on themes or whatever. Or perhaps you can think of a way to get everyone in on the group baking that we haven't mentioned yet.

Come up with a cool plan and toss it in the mix!

Let's aim for around Nov 19th to start the poll.
Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #23 on: October 31, 2011, 04:59:05 PM »
Just re-checked Amazon for the Short and Sweet Dan Lepard book due to launch in a couple of weeks and there's now a quick video of Dan talking about the new book.

Dan Lepard's new book - Short and Sweet


The contents sound interesting. But here's the, to my mind, rather formidable stumbling block: it's 576 pages long and has, as Dan says, over 280 recipes. The Breads section alone is about 65 recipes long, with 8 different recipe sections altogether. There's a "Look Inside" tool on the Amazon.com Kindle Edition page to get a better idea of the DEPTH of this book. I bet it would be a really tremendous book to own but...

280+ recipes!! Yipes. If we tackle one recipe per week (or 4 per month), that will take over five years to finish up. At a comparatively small 84 recipes (including several stacked ones like three Vermonts in one go) it took us a fair bit more than a year and a half to do Hamelman's book. Plus we lost a lot of folk along the way and couldn't get many on board past a certain point as we were too far ahead in the recipe list.

Long is not the best way. And SUPER long is even less so.

So I'm going to very seriously suggest we aim for something rather short and sweet, but not Short and Sweet. Besides, it looks like there is already another group tackling the book: http://shortandtweet.tumblr.com/ which Joanna/Zeb has already jumped into. So not much sense replicating that group's efforts.

Now I'm liking Hitz's book Artisan Pastries, with a simpler 30-some recipes, a whole lot better as it is looking easier to work in.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 05:55:51 PM by Paul »
Paul
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Offline Paul

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Re: What next?
« Reply #24 on: November 26, 2011, 12:19:05 AM »
I've now created a poll based on all the suggested books and ideas put forward, please take a few minutes to cast your votes and maybe even post your thoughts for that choice.
Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.