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Author Topic: Definition of Cider  (Read 2516 times)

Offline Zeb

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Definition of Cider
« on: February 02, 2011, 06:29:32 PM »
Cider in England and Ireland is always an alcoholic drink made from fermented pressed apples, usually carbonated too.

It comes in lots of different styles and strengths,  sweet, dry, scrumpy, clear, cloudy etc, but it is definitely an alcoholic drink. The Wiki article covers most of it. Link below.

Cider in America as I understand, refers to unfiltered apple juice.

Wiki article here:

So the Normandy Apple Bread is made with apple juice  :woot: Well, I didn't realise that till just now from commenting on Doc Fugawe's most recent blogpost, so I thought I'd mention this here.

Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline ostwestwind

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Re: Definition of Cider
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2011, 07:59:37 AM »
I knew the difference, but I always use Äbbelwoi if available for cider in English and American recipes ;-). If not I use cidre
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Offline Natashya KitchenPuppies

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Re: Definition of Cider
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2011, 12:27:38 PM »
In North America they usually say "hard cider" to mean the alcoholized version. I'm sure either would be yummy!

Offline ostwestwind

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Re: Definition of Cider
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2011, 02:57:12 PM »
It is yummy, and it is safe for children, because you don't have any alcohol left in the bread after baking ;-)
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Offline Zeb

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Re: Definition of Cider
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2011, 05:08:26 PM »
As I haven't made this bread either way yet I can't comment on the taste and I am sure that if you are a non alcohol drinker or you are concerned about residues of alcohol in bread then using apple juice is the way to go.

Steve B has just pointed me to his Pain Normand on his blog in which he has adapted the Hamelman recipe to use alcoholic cider and levain, which to me sounds a lot more interesting  :D

I like the sound of his bread I have to admit  :snicker:  I haven't decided yet how to approach this bread.

Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline ostwestwind

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Re: Definition of Cider
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2011, 08:06:42 AM »
I've baked a Normandy Rye from Nancy Silverton: Breads from the La Brea Bakery with cidre

http://ostwestwind.twoday.net/stories/4417201/

Great taste, both bread are great with Dorset Drum Cheddar
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