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Author Topic: Desired dough temperature  (Read 2328 times)

Offline Zeb

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Desired dough temperature
« on: April 08, 2010, 03:41:15 AM »
Anyone got an easy formula for calculating this when mixing the dough.

One in which you put in  room temperature
and flour temperature
and water temperature

I am not too worried about the friction bit as I mix by hand. I've read the section in the book about it and I go a bit cross eyed....  ::)
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline ostwestwind

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 08:20:54 AM »
Zeb,

I don't calculate the temperature in home baking. I just check it. But the simple formula is

(dough-temperature * 2) - flour temperature = water temperature

Ulrike aka ostwestwind at

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Offline Zeb

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2010, 03:43:50 AM »
Hi Ulrike I must admit I usually check it too, but lately I have been making bread with whey which comes out of the fridge and so I was considering warming the flour to compensate -  thanks for the formula   :)
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Zeb

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2010, 03:25:00 PM »
Today my kitchen was at the DDT of 24 C  so to celebrate I made a bread without looking anything up. First time ever! So would love to share it with you guys. Hope you are all having a great weekend.


Mixed sourdough light rye bread by Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

50 g mature rye starter at about 100 per cent hydration
100 g mature white starter ditto
320 g water at 22 C
50 g dark rye flour
200g strong white flour
250g very strong white flour (high gluten)
a squeeze of agave syrup
1/2 teaspoon instant active yeast
10 g salt

First prove approximately 3 hours, second prove after shaping about  2 hours.

Baked in a 230 C oven with steam for 10 minutes on a bread stone, falling to 220 C for 15 minutes and then as the dough was getting quite dark 190 C for 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack as the sun goes down. Slice while warm and eat with lashings of butter!

Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline Paul

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2010, 05:27:02 PM »
Wow, nice looking loaf there, Joanna!
Is the agave syrup (not that I'd be able to get any) just as a sweetener/flavour or does it do something specific to the dough?
Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline Zeb

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2010, 01:02:19 AM »
Paul, it doesn't do anything special, it was just the first out of the cupboard  ;D  I think it has a quite neutral taste, it's very very sweet, don't need much and I imagine it is less processed than other sugars. I just thought as it was so warm that the yeasts and sourdoughs could do with a little extra easy to access sugar.  Seems to be used a lot by people who don't want to use regular sugar.  I bought it in the wholefood shop one time.  I have a pull out thingy and on the top shelf are bottles of maple syrup, Swedish syrup, pomegranate molasses, treacle, golden syrup, agave, etc. None of which I use very often, all crystallising and feeling sorry for themselves, Michael McIntyre style -  he's my latest favourite standup, reminds you of Eddie Izard.

 Live at the Apollo - MICHAEL McINTYRE - HERBS & SPICES
Joanna @ Zeb Bakes

Offline qahtan

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Re: Desired dough temperature
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2010, 01:21:21 PM »
 Fab looking loaf Joanne,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, qahtan