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Author Topic: 80% wholerye with soaker  (Read 1433 times)

Offline jefklak

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80% wholerye with soaker
« on: July 21, 2012, 12:44:49 PM »
Hi mellow bakers,


My first attempt at baking with wholerye loaves left a taste for more so instead of going for the "straight" French bread, I baked Hamelman's 80% wholerye with soaker and a small portion of high-gluten flour.

You can read all about it here: http://www.savesourdough.com/80-wholerye-with-soaker/



Some thoughts:
- I like this one way better than the 70% with chopped rye, because it has been risen a bit (a bit of wheat present) and mainly because this one was more sour - I think I left my preferment out longer than the previous recipe
- I think I underpoofed the loaves quite a bit it's very difficult to see whether they're done - with rye bread in general. They seem to be much more fragile.

I'll try them again soon!

Offline Paul

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Re: 80% wholerye with soaker
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2012, 05:10:28 PM »
That looks really good...  :drool: I can just imagine a thin slice, toasted with a little butter on it. The aroma hits you first, the zing of sour followed by the sweet of the rye... Yum! OK, now I am really drooling.

Well done, sir!
Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline jefklak

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Re: 80% wholerye with soaker
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2012, 12:19:38 AM »
Haha thanks a lot, I'd like to send you a slice if you're interested.
I'm not sure whether you'd still eat it after travelling that far (mold may have taken over, yum, extra flavoring!)

I do also really love the smell and taste of this bread, it's as you said, "the zing of sour followed by the sweet of the rye". My white starter I use to bake french country bread and pain au levain is not sour at all (but I suspect it's not the starter but the preferment amount & fermentation time) - and this one is so I was quite proud.

I'm eagerly awaiting your own contribution for this year Paul :)

Offline Paul

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Re: 80% wholerye with soaker
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2012, 10:39:57 PM »
LOL I bake dozens of loaves of bread every day... Sourdough, whole wheat, country (white, a.k.a. 'French') bread, throwing in a new special bread-of-the-week into the mix now and again. Jumping back into this schedule is a long shot.

Besides, my home oven is HORRIBLE and doesn't keep a set temp so I'm off home baking for the foreseeable future. I gave up on getting anything decent out of it several months back. Well, twice now I've just had to scratch the itch and gave it 'another chance' but both times I wished I hadn't bothered.

I can't wait to get our own house in the next few months (we're currently renting) so I can get a decent oven again, even if I have to build one out of mud. Which is a very, very strong possibility anyway.

By the by, the very low turn out for this round of Hamelman makes me think I will simply bring back the entire remaining Archives in one go and let people jump in anywhere along the way. With the group slowly diminishing to you and only two other people doing last month's breads and now only you for July, it seems a bit overworked to maintain the group process when you can move through the remaining breads at your leisure.

Paul
Yumarama Blog

I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline jefklak

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Re: 80% wholerye with soaker
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2012, 12:23:22 AM »
Right, I should have known that you bake professionally considering I've read your blog posts. I hope you'll be able to buy a nice oven for your own house soon, I can imagine it's no fun not baking at home but would you still have the energy to do that if your work is baking bread?
I'm learning so much simply by reading other people's experience and trying out the recipes in the book. I did not even know what sourdough was a few months ago, and now I'd love to start a bakery myself but I doubt that would be doable within 5 years. I just wanted to express how much satisfaction you can get out of a single  baked loaf.

Too bad not many people are co-baking in this round, maybe we should start spamming at The Fresh Loaf? I understand maintenance would require too much for you, I'll still march on no mather what!
Thank a lot for making it possible for me to learn to properly bake Paul!