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Author Topic: A jab at the hot buns.  (Read 1806 times)

Offline jefklak

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A jab at the hot buns.
« on: March 04, 2012, 01:27:52 PM »
And missed by a mile or so, but hey, I did try, right?

I did follow the recipe but had some trouble with the US->Metric conversion. I did calculate everything before but still think I missed some things - the dough was too stiff and the crossing paste way too liquid. Strange. Anyway:



Looks... Yeah. Well.
After baking, I did some research in the archive forum here, and saw there are actually two versions of the paste recipe. I did the beaten egg + milk + equal amount of butter & sugar thing. That was way too little flour to get it to the right substance...

Once baked, it gets even funnier:



Where's my cross? Ouch.
At this point, I gave up on the glazing as I saw everything else was a disaster.


I think the most important mistakes I made were:
1) the sponge: taking milk from the fridge instead of warming it up to get the sponge to 80°F. It did *NOT* rise at all. Nada. 45 minutes later, nope. I saw Paul's pic of it in the archive and mine was way more liquid. I carried on anyway and thought "ah well." I think this resulted in underproofing as I didn't see anything rise (maybe a little bit). Used 170gr whole wheat 170gr white wheat.
2) the paste. See picture.

In the end, they did taste okay. I only have 2 small ones left.
I did take notes and hope next time will be a bit better but at least I tried :-)

Offline paulo

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2012, 02:55:04 AM »
Still need to tackle this one, haven't made it before but yeah the paste looks really liquid. What kind of sugar did you use? Shouldn't it be icing sugar since it's floury?

When it comes to conversions try to use the Baker's Percentage the next time you follow a recipe. Jeffrey does a really great job at explaining the mechanics (can't recall which chapter it is and I don't have the book with me at work...) behind it and then you can rest assured you get the right measures.

They do look yummy though.

*EDIT*: Ok, now I've checked where the other paste comes from, from the errata, and it's normal sugar. Wonder if they got it wrong in the errata. That's what I would call irony.

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Offline Paul

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2012, 08:23:45 AM »
General note to all: One thing to keep in mind when using the US or METRIC formulas is that they use FRESH YEAST so be sure to convert this to Instant Yeast if that is what you are doing. Although in effect a recipe that calls for 10 grams of FRESH yeast would use 3 grams of Instant so if you used the Fresh amount, you'd have massive expansion as you'd be using 3 times too much IDY.

Jef: Will you be giving these a second try? Do you have your notes on what quantities of ingredients you used for your own batch? Maybe we can figure out what went wrong from that...

Paolo: I don't think using powdered sugar vs regular sugar will make any difference in the paste as it's mixed in with a fair bit of liquid either way and will become a syrup. The 3% starch added to powdered sugar won't affect the viscosity any.


Crossing Paste: Note that the amount of paste made in both the original  (pastry flour, oil & water) and the modified errata version, makes a huge amount of paste for a dozen buns. Feel free to divide this. 

The "new" paste, primarily made up of 8 oz flour and 3 oz milk + 4 oz butter, should still be rather thick, much like pancake batter since it's pretty close to 100% hydration.

What I would suggest not be done: give up. Do give it another go and see if your second try isn't an improvement. Stopping at the first attempt is not really inspiring for yourself and doesn't help build your experience. Remember the old adage applies here extremely well: Success is a poor teacher. We learn most from failures. But not if you don't try and try again.

Remember that the buns I made (in the archives) were my first try at them as well, so there's nothing magical about the fact they worked well for me and numerous others. It could simply have been a miscalculation on an ingredient that threw it off for you.



So give these another go and see if the second time improves your skills or you have a "Aha!" moment where you realize you had missed a step. (I've done that more than once myself. Bagels with no salt, miscalculated yeast in challah, just a couple of the silly glitches I've been responsible for in the last few months.)
Paul
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Offline jefklak

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2012, 01:43:45 AM »
Hi Paul,

Thanks for the reply, I think I'll try them again this weekend or next weekend. I had too much fun with my sourdough this weekend (see other post).
I think I know what went wrong with the crossing paste: I used 10 times as much butter as needed - I corrected all wrong data with the errata sheet yesterday and it dit NOT read 1.14kg but .114kg - whoops... I'll indeed try to keep the baker's percentage in mind.

Plus, it's extremely difficult for me in Belgium to find good strong flour. I can't find anything above 9% protein content and yesterday I found out that most recipes are because of that too wet for me.

Offline Paul

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 08:34:39 AM »
9%, yipes. That's great for cake flour where you want little structure but is pretty useless for bread. Yeah, that will affect the end products for sure.

Have you by chance got a real bakery nearby where you could ask them what type of flour they use and then get in touch with the manufacturer? Or maybe even asking if you can buy flour from the baker?
Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline charliez

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2012, 02:33:35 PM »
Is there a way we can create higher protein flour by adding gluten?

I also have only one kind of flour in the supermarkets.  There are other
flours but they are sold at wholesale only. So I found gluten in my organic
products store and was thinking on adding gluten to the flour...

just a thought...
Saludos,

Carlos

Offline Paul

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2012, 07:51:27 PM »
Yes indeed, you can add Vital Wheat Gluten (VWG) to your current flour to increase it's gluten content. You would be well off Googling that to find out what ratio you need to exchange (take X grams of flour out, add X grams of VWG) to bump up the protein by Y%. I'm sure someone somewhere has broken that down already.



Paul
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I used to think I was indecisive, but now I'm not so sure.

Offline throup

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Re: Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2012, 11:33:07 AM »
I used 10 times as much butter as needed - I corrected all wrong data with the errata sheet yesterday and it dit NOT read 1.14kg but .114kg - whoops... I'll indeed try to keep the baker's percentage in mind.

I almost fell for that one too! I had got as far as measuring out both the butter and the flour before I decided that having 5× more butter than flour was a little extreme… I must remember to correct it in the book so I don't fall for it next time.
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Offline Platonist

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Re: A jab at the hot buns.
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2012, 10:20:02 PM »
I made the same mistake of using the milk right out of the fridge.  After thirty minutes, I looked into the bowl to find nothing but liquid.  So, I decided to put the bowl outside (I'm in Arizona where it hit 90 today).  I waited another thirty minutes and nothing happened.  I went on with the recipe as planned and they taste great.  But I can't help wondering...could they be better and I just don't have any idea what to compare them to as I've never had a hot cross bun in my life?  Hmm...